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Guest Post by: urbanpersonalsafety.com

From irate clients or tenants yelling in your office, to vacant home inspections, and attending properties alone, there are many potential situations that can make for a medium to high-risk work environment in real estate.

Whilst real estate is still a reasonably safe job, it is still an issue that needs to be addressed and that employers need to be aware of. With the proliferation of such drugs as ice and “flakka” along with increasing crime rates in certain areas, the real estate industry in Australia definitely has a growing risk profile.

Physical Self Defence Skills Are Only A Small Part

When it comes to advice on keeping yourself safe from violence, there is a plethora of propaganda that seems to centre around learning a particular fighting system (martial arts, MMA etc) and/or carrying and knowing how to use a weapon effectively (i.e. gun, knife).

The reality is, those things are only a small part of the equation. Over 80 percent of your personal safety has nothing to do with physical self defence skills.

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Awareness, understanding of body language, effectively reading facial expressions, understanding the violent criminal mind, positioning strategies, recognising Pre-Violence Cues, presenting yourself as a hard target, projecting intent, de-escalation techniques… are all a higher priority and what really works, if you want to prevent and avoid violent attacks.

The question is, do you want to prevent and avoid violence or do you secretly (or openly) desire it?

The Ultimate Key To Your Personal Safety

Every violent attack is precluded by warning signs. These signs can appear in your attacker’s movement, body language, facial expressions, tone of voice, specific things they are saying etc. Some of these you can pick up with your natural instincts and some you need training to recognise them.

We don’t have the time in this article to cover these Pre-Violence Cues in depth, so what I want to encourage you to do is start developing the number one key to your personal safety; environmental awareness. Start paying deliberate attention to what is going on around you when;

  • You talk to somebody on the phone
  • Meeting a person for the first time
  • Somebody thinks that you are not watching them (this can be most enlightening)

If you make this a regular practice, I guarantee that you’ll be surprised at what you start noticing.

Don’t be like the ostrich

My heartfelt recommendation to you is that, rather than being like the proverbial ostrich with its head in the sand, make it a habit to always be aware. It is the first step to ensuring your personal safety.

Written by John Wayne Legg – Click for LinkedIn

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